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Are you highlighting your best behaviours in a job interview?

Are you highlighting your best behaviours in a job interview?
They’re the questions that interviewers love – but they can pose a challenge for even well prepared job candidates: Tell me how you dealt with conflict with a co-worker. How did you react to your last major mistake in the workplace? Explain how you overcame a major challenge?

The formal name for these queries is ‘behavioural interview questions’ and if you want a fighting chance of getting the job, you’re going to have to get skilled at answering them.

 
 
 

“I QUIT.” What managers need to know about why employees leave

“I QUIT.” What managers need to know about why employees leave
Employers beware: data shows that many new staff members leave before they even finish settling in.

Every manager shares the same goal with new hires: that the hire will not only fill a key gap in the team but slide neatly into the broader workplace culture where they will work productively and be happy to stay for a reasonable period of time.

But Hudson data shows that for many managers a shock may be in store: one in five employees in Australia have left a new job within three months of starting.

 
 
 

Building rapport at an interview: it’s all about connecting

Building rapport at an interview: it’s all about connecting
Establishing a good rapport with someone you’ve just met can be a tough ask. Motivational speaker Tony Robbins provides insight into what’s involved: “Rapport is the ability to enter someone else's world, to make him feel that you understand him, that you have a strong common bond.”

Whatever else you have to offer, it’s going to be difficult to make it beyond the first round of interviews and secure a job if you’re unable to make your interviewers feel you’re on the same wavelength as them. Here are some tips on how to establish that emotional connection.

 
 
 

Having trouble keeping good staff? 5 ways to hire people who stay

Having trouble keeping good staff? 5 ways to hire people who stay
When managers are asked to define the most challenging part of their job, the answer, regardless of the industry, is often, “Finding and keeping good people.”

Recruit well and both the company and your team will reap rewards; but get it wrong and there are costs for all involved, be that time, money or morale.

 
 
 

You had me at hello: making a good first impression at a job interview

You had me at hello: making a good first impression at a job interview
They say that first impressions are lasting, and nowhere is this more relevant than in the interview room. Richard Branson says he tends to make up his mind about people within 30 seconds of meeting them.

While interviewers use many methods to assess candidates, it pays to make an effort to impress from the moment you walk in the door. Here are some tips to help you work your magic from the first hello.

 
 
 

Is It Time for a Career Change?

Is It Time for a Career Change?
Are you feeling bored, burnt out or just indifferent to the job you’re currently in? A complete career change may well be the answer to your work blues.

In my line of work, people often ask me whether it’s possible to make a career change. The answer, of course, is yes – but the key is knowing where to start and how to get there – smartly.

 
 
 

7 steps to hiring success

7 steps to hiring success
To hire right in 2015 managers must look beyond active job seekers and standard advertising practices towards far smarter sourcing strategies.

In a perfect world, hiring well would be a static skill, where techniques that found you the perfect hire last year would work just as well today. But that’s not the case in 2015; hiring is changing.

 
 
 

Do you have an unconscious bias in your recruitment?

Do you have an unconscious bias in your recruitment?
Your brain contains some 100 billion neurons and its blood vessels and transport systems stretch some 100,000 miles. Yet when it comes to the brain as a decision-making tool, one Nobel Prize winner argues there are only two sides of the brain that matter.

Daniel Kahneman, psychologist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics, is the author of the New York Times bestseller, Thinking, Fast and Slow, a culmination of two decades of research. His 2011 book defines two areas of the brain..

 
 
 

7 ways your LinkedIn profile could be working against you

7 ways your LinkedIn profile could be working against you
If your LinkedIn profile is merely an afterthought when you’re looking for your dream role, you may be losing out on major opportunities.

Professionals in all industries can’t afford to ignore LinkedIn. With almost 350 million members worldwide and 40 per cent of members logging in daily, a LinkedIn profile isn’t just desirable for today’s job seeker – it’s essential.

 
 
 

The 7 best questions to ask at an interview

The 7 best questions to ask at an interview
Interviews are a two-way street. To really impress an interviewer, you need to come prepared to have an intelligent conversation – and that means coming with well thought-out questions to ensure it’s not just one-way traffic.

Asking questions in your interview will not only give you a better insight into the job you’re applying for, but will show your interviewer that you’ve done your homework and have the curiosity and initiative to seek more information.

 
 
 
 

HUDSON

Hudson is a global talent solutions company. We help transform the workplace and unleash the full potential of organizations and individuals. Our expert team and proprietary tools provide you with unique insights and services that help you maximize your success. Across 20 countries, we deliver a range of recruitment, talent management and recruitment process outsourcing solutions to get you and your business where you want to be.